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3 common workplace hazards
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3 common workplace hazards

| Mar 2, 2021 | Worker's Compensation |

No matter what kind of job you do, your employer has a responsibility to provide you with a safe working environment. Nevertheless, inspectors frequently see safety hazards in all types of workplaces.

There are some dangers that are more common than others. You should look out for these safety hazards in your workplace and know what to do if you spot them.

1. Poor housekeeping

Some workplaces have a hard time finding sufficient storage. As a result, clutter builds up in critical safety areas, such as electrical rooms and emergency exits. When clutter blocks these areas, it makes them inaccessible to you in an emergency. If stacked too high, clutter can also block sprinkler heads in the ceiling, making fire mitigation less efficient at best.

Another hazard related to poor housekeeping is spills or leaks that could cause a tripping hazard. If you see a spill, you should clean it up or inform your supervisor right away. You should also report any leaks that you observe and raise concerns related to clutter.

2. Extension cords

Extension cords should only be a short-term solution to power a device. Long-term use may cause a tripping accident or cause the insulation around the cord to gradually wear away, posing a risk of electrical shock. Some workplaces use many extension cords connected to one another, which could eventually cause a fire due to overdrawing the circuits. If you notice long-term or inappropriate use of extension cords, you should talk to your supervisor about it.

3. Falls from height

Falling from a height to a lower level can result in serious injuries that may prove fatal. Your employer should provide you with protective equipment to prevent a fall. You should inspect this equipment before using it and tell a supervisor if it seems dangerously worn or otherwise unsafe. If you come across any areas that should have anchor points but do not, you should report them so your employer can have them installed.

You have a right to a safe workplace. If you see safety problems, you should bring them up to the people who have the ability to correct them.